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Finishes #2 and #3..........

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Finish #2 for January.
I finished the hand stitching last night on the binding of this batik Bento Box quilt.  It is 56.5" x 80".  There isn't a pattern for this version.  I just used measurements that I wanted to make the blocks.  Here is a mini tutorial on the way I assembled the blocks. 




I bought the batik that I used for backing on sale a few years ago.

















Finish #3 for January.  I finished the machine stitched binding on this batik Trip Around the World last night too.  It has 120 different fabrics, 5 different fabrics for each color ring.  Here is a post about mug rugs where I explain how I do the binding.  The only difference is that I cut the strips wider for a large quilt and sew it on with a 3/8" seam. 


The batik backing is another good sale purchase.  The quilt is 66" x 91". 

This post shows the fabric choices and the size of the pieces when I was first working on it.








The vertical line quilting drew it in about 3.5" in width.
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skittone
4 minutes ago
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First quilt is very cool.
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Preventing 2017 America from becoming like 1934 Germany: A watchlist

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In The New Yorker, Adam Gopnik has an excellent piece pointing out the true threats to U.S. democracy, which transcend partisan concerns. As patriotic Americans, can we recognize these threats, separately from policy outcomes we like or dislike? What bright-line events would be difficult to remedy by sitting passively until the next election?

He advises that policy concerns are simply normal politics:

Many programs and policies with which progressive-minded people passionately disagree will be put forward over the next few years. However much or strongly one opposes them, they are, like it or not, the actual agreed-on platform of a dominant national party….One may oppose these things—and one should, passionately and permanently—but they are in no sense illegitimate….They are also reversible by the same laws and rules and norms and judicial and, perhaps most of all, electoral processes that created them. If we want gun control, we need to get more people caring about it and more people in more places voting for it; we cannot complain because people who don’t want gun control don’t give it to us.

But, he continues, threats to American institutions are more serious.

Assaults on free speech; the imprisoning of critics and dissidents; attempts, on the Russian model, likely to begin soon, to intimidate critics of the regime with fake charges and conjured-up allegations; the intimidation and intolerance of even mild dissidence (that “Apologize!” tweet directed at members of the “Hamilton” cast who dared to politely petition Mike Pence); not to mention mass deportations or attempts at discrimination by religion—all things that the Trump and his cohorts have openly contemplated or even promised—are not part of the normal oscillations of power and policy. They are unprecedented and, history tells us, likely to be almost impossible to reverse.

These possibilities are reminiscent of my previous note, What Actions Are Shared To All Fascist Movements? I’ve been wondering what would be likely, bright-line indicators that institutions are collapsing. The depredations will be hard to keep up with, but it might be good to have a checklist before the inauguration.

  1. Taking sides with a foreign power against domestic opposition (this already happened, but is worth a re-mention).
  2. Detention of journalists.
  3. Loss of press access to the White House.
  4. Made-up charges against those who disagree with the government.
  5. Use of governmental power to target individual citizens for retribution.
  6. Use of a terrorist incident or an international incident to take away civil liberties.
  7. Persecution of an ethnic or religious minority, either by the Administration or its supporters.
  8. Defying the orders of courts, including the Supreme Court.

Some are listed by Gopnik. Can you think of more?

Of course, it is certainly possible that very few of these events will come to pass. That would be by far the best outcome. After all, Trump is a historically unpopular President-elect – the least popular in the history of modern polling.

However, it seems wise now to lay out a worst-case scenario, and be ready for it. As Gopnik says, it is time for the political left and right to make common cause:

So we need to stiffen our spines and broaden our embrace, grasp tightly but reach out far. The conservatives who see Trump for what he is and are shocked by it—and there are many, though not as many as there should be—should be welcomed….The best way to be sure that 2017 is not 1934 is to act as though it were. We must learn and relearn that age’s necessary lessons: that meek submission is the most short-sighted of policies; that waiting for the other, more vulnerable group to protest first will only increase the isolation of us all. We must refuse to think that if we play nice and don’t make trouble, our group won’t be harmed. Calm but consistent opposition shared by a broad front of committed and constitutionally-minded protesters—it’s easy to say, fiendishly hard to do, and necessary to accomplish if we are to save the beautiful music of American democracy.”

The right sidebar contains useful links that may help you in this regard.

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skittone
7 hours ago
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1 public comment
zippy72
3 hours ago
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Actually pretty much the opposite. Gun control laws were much stricter under the Weimar Republic, Hitler and co actually made owning a gun easier as time went on (so long as you weren't an "unreliable" person - i.e., Jewish)
FourSquare, qv

politicalprof:Indeed it is.

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politicalprof:

Indeed it is.

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skittone
7 hours ago
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Yes. Also, the old protestor made a nice sign.
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After 146 Years, Ringling Bros. And Barnum & Bailey Circus To Shut Down

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Asian elephants perform for the final time in the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus last May, in Providence, R.I. After its controversial use of the animals for its shows, the company retired the elephants to its 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida. Bill Sikes/AP hide caption

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Bill Sikes/AP

Asian elephants perform for the final time in the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus last May, in Providence, R.I. After its controversial use of the animals for its shows, the company retired the elephants to its 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida.

Bill Sikes/AP

After its nearly century and a half run, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus plans to shut down "The Greatest Show On Earth."

The historic American spectacle will deliver its final show in May, says Kenneth Feld, the chairman and CEO of Feld Entertainment, the producer of Ringling.

Feld announced the news on the company website Saturday night, citing declining ticket sales — which dipped even lower as the company retired its touring elephants.

"This, coupled with high operating costs, made the circus an unsustainable business for the company," Feld says.

Ringling has been phasing out elephants as a result of shifting public tastes and criticism from animal rights groups over the well-being of the animals.

The company held its last show featuring elephants in May, before completely retiring the animals to its 200-acre conservation center in Polk City, Fla., established by Feld Entertainment in 1995.

Elephants had been a circus mainstay almost as long as the circus itself has been a staple of American entertainment, since Phineas Taylor Barnum introduced Jumbo, an Asian elephant in 1882.

But before the traveling exhibition evolved into a regular destination for wholesome family fun, Barnum "made a traveling spectacle of animals and human oddities popular, while the five Ringling brothers performed juggling acts and skits from their home base in Wisconsin," reports the AP. "Eventually, they merged and the modern circus was born. The sprawling troupes traveled around America by train, wowing audiences with the sheer scale of entertainment and exotic animals."

The Feld family bought Ringling in 1967 and employs about 500 people for both touring shows "Circus Extreme" and "Out of This World." Those employees were told about the closure after shows in Orlando and Miami, on Saturday night.

"The Felds say their existing animals — lions, tigers, camels, donkeys, alpacas, kangaroos and llamas — will go to suitable homes," adds the AP. "Juliette Feld says the company will continue operating the Center for Elephant Conservation."

In addition to the circus, Feld Entertainment also runs a number of high-profile traveling shows, from Monster Jam and Supercross to Marvel Universe Live and Disney on Ice.

Each year, Feld Entertainment's live shows draw some 30 million attendees.

Before it draws the curtain, the two touring circuses will perform a total of 30 shows over the next four months, in major cities including Atlanta, Washington, Philadelphia, Boston and Brooklyn.

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skittone
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Correlation is not causation

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More examples here.  Please share the link, because way WAY too many people do not understand this fundamental principle of science.
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JayM
32 minutes ago
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Atlanta, GA
skittone
7 hours ago
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ryanbrazell
17 hours ago
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Today I learned that longer spelling bee words make venomous spiders angry, and they take it out on humans.
Richmond, VA

ce-sac-contient: Chiharu Shiota - The Key in the Hand, 2015 Old...

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ce-sac-contient:

Chiharu Shiota - The Key in the Hand, 2015

Old keys, old wooden boats, red wool

International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale, Japan Pavilion
Photograph: Sunhi Mang

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skittone
7 hours ago
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wreichard
13 hours ago
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That's gorgeous.
Earth
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